Archive for January 2018

In most European countries and even US or Canada, dental care is extremely expensive and only basic treatments are covered by health insurance plans.
 
Today’s unhealthy lifestyle, diets and longer lifespans than previous generations used to have, gradually increased the demand for qualitative and professional dental works. Prices for extensive reconstructive and restorative procedures or complicated surgery can run up to several thousands of euros, but fortunately nowadays patients don’t need to sacrifice quality for costs reasons. 
 
Private clinics from developing countries, like India, can provide the same high standards treatments and procedures as any other developed country for a fraction of their cost. For personalized consultancy and a detailed treatment plan please contact our specialists. Dr Nishant Gandhi.
Dentistry in India is well suited both for tourists visiting the country, and there are plenty of places to visit, and for business travellers that are pleasantly surprised to find out that they can associate their trip with a high quality dental treatment.
 
Besides work proficiency, Indian clinics are both also offer a wide range of services, from dental implants to cosmetic surgery, all for very affordable prices. Also, patients will be greeted by polite, multilingual and educated personnel.
 
Our team of qualified Indian doctors is specialized in all areas of dentistry and can provide complete solutions recognized worldwide. We understand the importance of progress and continuous learning in this domain, therefore our specialists are constantly attending training courses in order to always be up to date with the latest technologies. We also consistently invest in the latest and most performant equipment in order to make sure our patients always receive the best solution for their dental problems.
 
We know that visiting a foreign country for the first time might feel uncomfortable for some of our patients, and therefore we are prepared to provide them with a completely organized trip, for with everything will be taken care of, from accommodation, travel arrangements to a list with places they might like to visit during their staying and treatment in India. Historical Places, Scenic spots, Mountain view, forts, temples, churches, we have it all in our itinerary and  we are sure Indian cities and sceneries will satisfy the most sophisticated and demanding tastes.


 

Dental tourism is a fast growing worldwide medical domain along with increasingly educated and specialized generations of dentists and dental technicians. Also, all technological discoveries are now spreading much faster, allowing specialists in the developing countries to provide equally qualitative services as those offered in the developed countries but with an additional cost saving solution.
Patients usually seek professional help for two types of dental problemspain and deterioration of their denture or aesthetic issues regarding the unattractive appearance
 
Each problem requires a different type of dental work, for example surgery or root canal treatments for the first one and braces, implants, crowns or dental bridges for the second one.  Every time a patient turns to the services provided by a dental clinic, he/she should go through an investigation phase where all his problems will be detected and diagnosed. Afterwards, the dental specialist must create a treatment plan that would best suit the needs of the patient, while meticulously solving each and every issue and request he/she might have.
 
Some treatments and procedures might take several days or even weeks, therefore many patients must be prepared to take a vacation from work in order to dedicate the necessary time and attention to their dental problems. In this case it is obvious that many of them would want to pair their dental treatment abroad with a vacation in that respective country. In this way they can enjoy their vacation, visit a foreign country, fix their dental problems, and all of these without missing from work for a long period from work. Add to this the fact that is a cost saving solution and you can understand why this method became a true phenomenon in the past years.
 

 

The right diet and nutrition play an integral part in ensuring strong teeth and healthy gums. Sugar, natural or processed, is your teeth's deadliest enemy and is the prime cause of tooth decay. Retentive sticky foods (such as raisins, caramels, toffees, slowly dissolving hard candies, etc.) that are not quickly diluted by saliva also pose a major risk in the formation of dental cavities. Even apparently harmless wafers/chips are retained on the tooth for a long period of time & eventually broken down into carbohydrates & sugars leading to decay. 
Many inter-related factors must be considered when the growth and development of children is being evaluated in respect to their oral health. Children should be given carbohydrates in their natural forms (as far as possible). They should be encouraged to eat hard fruits in whole instead of juices. This helps cleanse and stimulate teeth. Sticky/soft foods like white bread, pastries, aerated drinks, doughnuts, sweet rolls and processed cereals, one of the biggest causes of tooth decay, should be avoided. Beverages like lassi, buttermilk and home-made squashes should be encouraged. 
 
Sticky Foods
The longer food remains in your mouth, the greater the chance for decay. Rinse your mouth immediately after eating, especially if you've just had something sweet, to prevent the formation of plaque. Remember, rinsing after meals and brushing teeth at least twice daily is essential to keep tartar and plaque at bay. Use an effective, clinically tested toothpaste that provides long time protection between brushings.
 
Crash Diet
In an article that appeared in Reuters Health News of May 14, crash dieting can affect more than your figure. With the focus of the media on diets, exercise equipment and personal care products, people are more concerned with their appearance and physical health than ever. Teenagers have been known to start that Monday morning crash diet without ever realizing that this may in fact be the incorrect way to diet. These crash dieters who excessively fast, or diet on an on and off pattern, tend to have a lack of, or decrease in certain vitamins, most notably Vitamins D, B-12 and calcium. They also tend to lack certain minerals and proteins in their diets. These are very important vitamins especially for the health of the teeth and gums. Dieters also tend to take diet pills that may cause a decrease in saliva flow as a side effect. This decrease in saliva flow tends to increase the acid levels in the mouth, which may cause an increased level of cavity formation. What may be recommended is that dieters consult with their health care provider or nutritionist to determine what type of diet they should be on. Vitamin levels and a balanced diet with all food groups should be evaluated. As always, sound oral hygiene and regular visits to the dentist help decrease oral health problems.
 
Vitamins
Supplements, together with good oral hygiene, can aid in decreasing the incidence of dental cavities, bad breath and gum disease. Vitamins, such as a vitamin C, flavanoids and coenzyme Q10 are powerful antioxidants that protect gums against cell damage and promote healing. Vitamin C is vital for the production of collagen - the main protein building block for fibrous framework of all living tissues - which, in turn, makes it more resistant to bacterial penetration. Vitamin C also promotes healthy capillaries, which aids oral tissue in staying healthy. Insufficient consumption of Vitamin C may lead to oral health problems like swollen and bleeding gums and loss of teeth can result.
Tongue cleaning is very important. It helps to reduce bad breath and improve oral hygiene status because a large number of bacteria reside in the rough corrugated surface of tongue. Most dental professionals advise that poor oral hygiene, such as not brushing, not flossing, or not rinsing enough is the leading cause of gum disease and tooth decay. Smoking, chewing beetle nut and tobacco are also factors that adversely affect oral hygiene. These habits can cause bad breath, decay, gum disease, damage to tooth enamel, eventual tooth loss and in many cases even lead to oral cancer.
With a little awareness and knowledge on the subject of oral care, there could be some prettier smiles around the world and less misery from tooth decay.

There are various treatments for impressive smile. Cosmetic dentistry can transform unattractive teeth into beautiful teeth by reshaping them. In short, cosmetic dentistry can give a dental facelift to anyone having chipped, crooked, discoloured, broken or badly shaped teeth and enhance their smile. The most common procedures that are used in cosmetic dentistry are bonding, bleaching, porcelain veneers, crowns and reshaping of teeth.
 
Veneers: Veneers are made out of composite or porcelain laminates that are cemented to the surface of a tooth. They are used to correct and repair chipped and cracked tooth and improve the appearance of teeth. Those having gap in their teeth are often recommended this treatment. Veneers can be used for whitening stained or discoloured teeth and improves teeth appearance and strength.
 
Teeth whitening: Teeth whitening, also known as teeth bleaching, is probably the most commonly recommended procedure to brighten up teeth that have stained or discoloured due to smoking, drinking excessive tea, coffee and wine or due to poor dental hygiene. Bleaching teeth can enhance your smile and give you self-confidence.. Peroxide based materials coupled with high density light are used to whiten teeth. Not everyone can do teeth whitening. One must have healthy gums and should have all cavities filled, before going for this treatment.
 
Tooth-shaping: Tooth shaping is a procedure that involves removing of enamel of teeth and shaping long and short teeth and rounding off teeth that are pointed. This painless and quick procedure can provide a smile makeover to a person with uneven or badly shaped teeth.
 
Bonding: Bonding is a process in which composite tooth coloured materials are bonded to fill small cavities or repair chipped or broken and discoloured teeth to improve the appearance of teeth. A composite material that looks like enamel or dentin is placed into the cavity or on the surface of the tooth and sculpted into the required shape and then hardened with the high-intensity light to match the surrounding tooth structure to provide a natural look and healthy bright smile.    
 
Dental Implants: Dental implant is a procedure that involves artificial tooth root replacements to compensate tooth loss. This procedure can enhance persons smile and provide young look as a missing tooth most often cause a person to look older.
 

Plaque is the sticky, colorless film of bacteria that forms on teeth. It makes teeth "feel fuzzy" to the tongue and is most noticeable when teeth are not brushed.

What Causes Plaque and Why Is It Harmful?

Plaque develops when foods containing carbohydrates (sugars and starches), such as milk, soft drinks, raisins, cakes, or candy are frequently left on the teeth. Bacteria that live in the mouth thrive on these foods, producing acids as a result. Over a period of time, these acids destroy tooth enamel, resulting in tooth decay. Plaque can also develop on the tooth roots under the gum and cause breakdown of the bone supporting the tooth.

How Can Plaque Formation Be Prevented?

  • To prevent plaque buildup, brush your teeth at least twice a day with a soft, rounded-tip bristled toothbrush. Pay particular attention to the space where the gums and teeth meet. Use a fluoride-containing toothpaste.
  • Floss between teeth at least once a day to remove food particles and bacteria.
  • Use an antibacterial mouth rinse to reduce bacteria that cause plaque and gum disease.
  • See your dentist or oral hygienist every 6 months for a check-up and teeth cleaning.
  • Ask your dentist if a dental sealant is appropriate for you. Dental sealants are a thin, plastic coating that are painted on the chewing surfaces of teeth to protect them from cavities and decay.
  • Eat a balanced diet and limit the number of between-meal snacks. If you need a snack, choose nutritious foods such as plain yogurt, cheese, fruit, or raw vegetables. Vegetables, such as celery, help remove food and help saliva neutralize plaque-causing acids.
 
 
 

Old Age Teeth Problems

January 24, 2018 | Posted Teeth problem | 1 - Comment

You may wonder why you’re suddenly getting cavities when you haven’t had them in years. As we get older, we enter a second round of cavity prone years. One common cause of cavities in older adults is dry mouth. Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. However, it is a side-effect in more than 500 medications, including those for allergies or asthma, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, pain, anxiety or depression, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. This is just one reason why it’s so important to tell your dentist about any medications that you’re taking. Your dentist can make recommendations to help relieve your dry mouth symptoms and prevent cavities. Here are some common recommendations:

  • Use over-the-counter oral moisturizers, such as a spray or mouthwash.
  • Consult with your physician on whether to change the medication or dosage.
  • Drink more water. Carry a water bottle with you, and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Your mouth needs constant lubrication.
  • Use sugar-free gum or lozenges to stimulate saliva production.
  • Get a humidifier to help keep moisture in the air.
  • Avoid foods and beverages that irritate dry mouths, like coffee, alcohol, carbonated soft drinks, and acidic fruit juices.
  • Your dentist may apply a fluoride gel or varnish to protect your teeth from cavities. 

Gum Disease

Many older adults have gum, or periodontal disease, caused by the bacteria in plaque, which irritate the gums, making them swollen, red and more likely to bleed. One reason gum disease is so widespread among adults is that it’s often a painless condition until the advanced stage. If left untreated, gums can begin to pull away from the teeth and form deepened spaces called pockets where food particles and more plaque may collect. Advanced gum disease can eventually destroy the gums, bone and ligaments supporting the teeth leading to tooth loss. The good news is that with regular dental visits gum disease can be treated or prevented entirely.

Mouth Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, there are about 35,000 cases of mouth, throat and tongue cancer diagnosed each year. The average age of most people diagnosed with these cancers is 62. During dental visits, your dentist will check for any signs of oral cancer. Regular dental visits are important because in the early stages oral cancer typically does not cause pain and early detection saves lives. Some symptoms you may see include open sores, white or reddish patches, and changes in the lips, tongue and lining of the mouth that lasts for more than two weeks.

Smoking and other tobacco products can lead to gum disease by affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to your teeth. More specifically, it appears that smoking interferes with the normal function of gum tissue cells. This interference makes smokers more susceptible to infections, such as periodontal disease, and also seems to impair blood flow to the gums - which may affect wound healing.
 
Cigars and cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products (for example, snuff and chewing tobacco) contain at least 28 chemicals that have been shown to increase the risk of oral cancer and cancer of the throat and esophagus. In fact, chewing tobacco contains higher levels of nicotine than cigarettes, making it harder to quit than cigarettes. And one can of snuff delivers more nicotine than over 60 cigarettes.
Smokeless tobacco can irritate your gum tissue, causing it to recede or pull away from your teeth. Once the gum tissue recedes, your teeth roots become exposed, creating an increased risk of tooth decay. Exposed roots are also more sensitive to hot and cold or other irritants, making eating and drinking uncomfortable.
In addition, sugars, which are often added to enhance the flavor of smokeless tobacco, can increase your risk for tooth decay. A study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association showed that chewing tobacco users were four times more likely than nonusers to develop tooth decay.
Smokeless tobacco also typically contains sand and grit, which can wear down your teeth

About a year ago, I went to the dentist for what I thought was a regular checkup. My dentist took one look at my teeth and asked, "Are you stressed?" Apparently my teeth showed evidence of bruxism. My dentist explained that bruxism, a condition most often caused by stress, involves grinding your teeth, either at night or throughout the day, without realizing it.

Are you waking up with headaches, a sore jaw or neck pain? Then you may be unconsciously grinding or clenching your teeth, as well. Bruxism is a fairly common disorder. Often, it is mild and may not even require treatment. However, if your condition is severe enough, it may cause irreversible damage to your teeth, such as wearing down the enamel, fracturing teeth or loosening previous dental work. So how can you quit clenching teeth and save your smile?

Reduce Stress

As my dentist pointed out, increased anxiety or stress is one of a number of causes of clenching teeth. To reduce your bruxism, learn how to manage your stress. If you're going through a particularly rough patch in your life, don't rule out professional counseling. For other stress relievers, try exercise or meditation. Even something as simple as a relaxing bath before bed may go a long way in reducing your bruxism.

Wear a Mouth Guard or Splint

Mouth guards and splints are worn at night while sleeping. They won't eliminate your bruxism, but they will protect your teeth and help redistribute the force of teeth clenching or grinding. They are available over-the-counter or you can have one custom-made by your dentist. Typically, custom-made guards are higher quality and work better than over-the-counter options, but can be much more expensive. Ask your dentist for a professional recommendation.

Correct Misaligned Teeth

If your bruxism appears to be caused by a problem with teeth alignment, correcting your misalignment may help. Your dentist may fit your teeth with orthodontics or braces to correct your bite and alignment. When bruxism has worn down your tooth so much that you have problems chewing, your dentist may recommend a reconstructive treatment such as crowns or overlays.

Avoid Caffeine and Alcohol

Avoid caffeine and other stimulating substances in the evening. Coffee, tea, soda and chocolate should be off limits after dinner. These stimulants affect the quality of your sleep, making you more likely to clench your teeth during sleeping. Similarly, avoid alcohol, which also adversely affects the quality of sleep.

Muscle Relaxant

If your bruxism is particularly severe, your dentist may recommend that you take a muscle relaxant, before sleeping. A muscle relaxant will help keep your jaw from clenching throughout the night. These types of drugs can be habit forming, so they should be used with caution.

Acupuncture

Anecdotal evidence suggests that acupuncture can calm bruxism. Although acupuncture has not been clinically proved to cure bruxism, many people have reported that regular treatments have reduced their bruxism.

Tooth decay, also known as a cavity, or cavities, occurs when bacteria living in your mouth make acid that then begins to eat away at your teeth. Untreated tooth decay may cause infection, extreme pain and the loss of tooth. The decay process begins with the unnoticeable damage to the enamel of your teeth and then steadily progresses to deeper layers of the tooth, eventually leading to the pulp. The pulp of your teeth contains highly-sensitive blood vessels and nerves.

The top 10 causes of tooth decay include:

Poor Oral Hygiene Practices: Poor oral hygiene not only includes brushing your teeth regularly, but not flossing regularly, not brushing your tongue, and not using mouth wash. You should brush your teeth at least twice a day – morning and night, but it is ideal to brush after every meal. And remember to brush for at least two minutes. Set a little timer for yourself while you’re brushing to ensure that you brush your teeth for the full two minutes. Improper oral hygiene will ultimately lead to tooth decay. Tooth decay due to poor oral hygiene is avoidable.

Deep Tooth Crevices and Enamel Issues:

Individuals with enamel issues and who have deep crevices in their teeth are highly-likely to have problems with tooth decay. This is because the deep crevices allow bacteria and plaque easy access to grow. Dental sealants are typically used to prevent tooth decay in patients with deep tooth crevices. A dental sealant is only safe for uninfected teeth for the prevention of tooth decay.

Improper Nutrition: 

Avoiding foods that are high in sugar, high in carbohydrates and high in acid is the best way to avoid tooth decay due to improper nutrition. Eating a healthy diet, which includes healthy foods and the avoidance of sugary acidic drinks is the way to go.

Sugary Foods: 

Sugary foods are the best friends of the bacteria in your mouth. The bacteria in your mouth literally feed off of sugary foods, and then begin to coat your teeth in damaging acid. This can all happen in a matter of seconds and can occur several times over the course of just one meal, which is why it’s recommended to brush your teeth after each meal to eliminate acid. When thinking of sugary foods, you more than likely think of “candy” and things like that, when in fact, there are many foods that contain “hidden sugars.” So be careful and always be on the lookout for hidden sugars. Remember, sugary drinks such as juice are just as damaging to your teeth as soda.

Acidic Foods and Drinks: 

When most people think of “acidic” they more than likely think of “soda,” when in fact many common foods which people consume on a daily basis contain acid. Shockingly, even foods such as fish and bread contain acid. Of course, carbonated beverages such as soda, as well as fruit juice are all acidic agents which cause tooth decay. Unlike the way that bacteria feed off of sugary foods so they can coat the teeth in acid, acidic foods and drinks immediately begin to damage tooth enamel with their own acid.

Dry Mouth Issues: 

Due to the fact that saliva helps inhibit the growth of plaque, persons with dry mouth conditions will more than likely have dental issues which lead to tooth decay. Dry mouth may be caused by prescription medications, it may be genetic, or it may be caused by medical conditions such as Diabetes. A vigilant dentist will work closely with a patient to prevent tooth decay or further tooth decay due to dry mouth issues.

Tooth Grinding:

Many people grind their teeth and do not even realize that they do this. Tooth grinding typically occurs when persons are asleep or when they’re under immense stress. Tooth grinding leads to tooth decay due to the fact that it strips away the outer layer of tooth enamel. Tooth grinding is preventable with the use of a “bite guard,” also known as a “night guard,” and with the reduction of stress.

Genetics:

Often times, many people have issues with tooth decay thanks to genetics. Just as you inherit the color of your eyes and hair from your family, you also inherit deep tooth crevices and enamel issues, which lead to cavities.

Age: 

There are many reasons that cavities become more common with age, but some include common prescription medications which cause dry mouth, the recession of gums with age, and improper oral hygiene finally catching up with age.

Patient: Hi Doctor, I am in my 1st trimester of pregnancy. I had no dental issues ever before. But suddenly I have notice some problems happening to me unexpectedly such as gum swelling, bleeding from the gums, sensitivity in tooth. I have never had this before and I wonder if my pregnancy has any connection with these problems and how can I resolve this without much medication to avoid any adverse effect on my foetus.
With pregnancy, discomfort comes with the territory. Your body is changing, so a sore back or trouble getting comfortable is par for the course. But while you're piling up pillows to help you sleep at night, you might notice another source of pregnancy discomfort: Your teeth. Sensitive teeth during pregnancy can happen to expecting mothers, and knowing that other pregnant women suffer from the same symptoms might be somewhat comforting.
Nonetheless, here's what may be causing your sore teeth and gums, and how to deal with the pain safely:
 
Patient: Hi Doctor, What are the expected changes during pregnancy. I am in my 1st few weeks of pregnancy and heard that I can be prone to teeth pain issues during the course. And how can I cope with them.  
Pregnancy Changes
Each of the hormonal changes happening in your body are equally the biggest culprits in tooth and gum pain during pregnancy. From increased blood flow to hyperactive hormones, pregnancy takes its toll. The most common causes of sensitive teeth during pregnancy include:

  • Hormones, pregnancy hormones can affect the way your body responds to bacteria, which can lead to periodontal infection and – you guessed it – sore teeth and gums.
  • Increased blood flow. Your body is working overtime to support both you and your little one, which results in increased blood flow in the body. This increased blood flow can create sensitive, swollen gums that are tender to the touch. Hot and cold foods can therefore trigger that sensitivity, even if you've never experienced it before.
  • Gum disease. Pregnant women are more susceptible to gum disease, which can also be a catalyst for preterm labor. Of course, bleeding, sore and infected gums can definitely lead to a sore mouth and plenty of discomfort.
How to Respond

Although pregnancy can limit some of the medicinal intervention often used to treat sore teeth and gums, with some extra care and attention, you can keep your smile healthy during your prenatal nine months. Maintaining all the great hygiene habits you've used up to this point will keep you healthy and pain-free, so don't forget to give your mouth a little TLC, too. Here are four things you can do for your sensitive teeth during pregnancy:
  1. Choose a soft-bristled brush. Sensitive teeth require a sensitive touch,cleans between and around teeth both thoroughly and gently to reduce soreness and bleeding gums into the future.
  2. Take note of the foods that trigger sensitivity. Have you experienced a toothache while drinking tea? Do you find that ice cream puts you in pain? It's best to avoid these "trigger foods." In most cases, according to the ADA, sensitivity in the gums goes away after pregnancy, so any subsequent tenderness in your teeth should subside as well, allowing you to indulge in hot and cold foods again in the near future.
  3. Eat  LESS sweets. Sugar feeds the bacteria in your mouth, which can lead to cavities and soreness. If possible, reduce the amount of sweets you're consuming. If you must indulge, have a treat and then follow up by brushing to remove this fresh debris from your mouth.
  4. See your dentist. Don't use pregnancy as an excuse to avoid your regular checkup, which keeps your smile healthy even when you're expecting. Just make sure to remind your dentist that you are pregnant, so proper precautions can be taken (like forgoing certain types of x-rays).
It's true that pregnancy means a period of change, especially for your body. But you don't need to endure oral discomfort. Talk to your OB/GYN for safe pain medication suggestions and to ensure that your sensitive teeth don't make for an unpleasant nine months. With consistent professional guidance and personal care, you'll be able to enjoy your pregnancy without worrying about the dental side-effects.
 

Regular Dental Checkup

January 24, 2018 | Posted Dental Visit | 1 - Comment


Patient: I visit a dentist only when I have pain or any dental issue. Otherwise I don’t bother to see a dentist for years. Is it required to do a dental checkup regularly or I can visit the Dentist only, if I face any trouble. Please advice on a cost effective best option.

Dr: A regular dental check up is important because they help keep your teeth and gums healthy. You should have a regular dental visit at least every 6 months or as recommended by your dental professional.

Patient: What happens at a regular dental checkup visit?

Dr: There are 2 parts to a regular dental visit – check up, or examination and the cleaning, or oral prophylaxis.
At the dental check up your dental professional will check for cavities. X-rays might be taken to detect cavities between your teeth. The check up will also include a clinical examination for plaque and tartar on your teeth. Plaque is a clear, sticky layer of bacteria. If it is not removed, it can harden  to form a tartar. You cannot remove tartar with brushing and flossing. If plaque and tartar build up on your teeth, they can cause oral diseases.

Next, your gums will be checked. This will be done with a special tool to measure the depth of the pocket between your teeth and gums. With healthy gums, the pockets are shallow. When people have gum disease, the pockets may go deeper.
The check-up should also include a careful examination of your tongue, throat, face, head, and neck. This is to look for any signs of trouble - swelling, redness, or possible signs of oral cancer.

Your teeth will also be cleaned at your visit. Brushing and flossing help clean the plaque from your teeth, but you cannot remove tartar at home. During the cleaning, your dental professional will use special tools to remove tartar. This is called scaling
After your teeth are scaled, they may be polished. In most cases, a gritty paste is used for this. It helps to remove any surface stains on your teeth.The final step is flossing. Your dental professional will use floss to make sure the areas between your teeth are clean.

Patient: What you should do between each dental visit. Are their any guidelines to follow?

Dr: Be sure to take care of your teeth and gums between regular dental visits. Plaque is always forming on your teeth, but you can manage it by brushing and flossing regularly. Here are some tips for good oral care at home.
Brush your teeth at least twice a day. Be sure to use a toothpaste that contains fluoride.
Floss daily.
Use a mouthwash to help control plaque bacteria. This will also help to keep your breath fresh.

Quick facts about a regular dental check up

Regular dental visits are important because they help to keep your teeth and gums healthy.

There are two parts to a regular dental visit: 

- The check up 
- The cleaning

During the dental check up, your dental professional will check your overall oral health for any trouble areas.
During the cleaning, your dental professional will remove any plaque and tartar buildup and may polish your teeth.
You should have a regular dental visit at least twice a year or as recommended by your dental professional.

Patient: I have noticed that my Gums are bleeding at times.  Is this normal. Should I be concerned about it. What can be the cause of it.


Noticing that your gums bleed when you brush or floss can be alarming. What are the possible causes of bleeding gums? There are different reasons that gums may start to bleed during brushing, some are temporary and some are of more concern. If you are worried about your oral health, then make an appointment with your dentist.
 
 
Gingivitis
Gingivitis is the first stage of gum disease. Plaque on your teeth and at the gumline that is not cleaned by brushing and flossing can infect the gums and lead to the symptoms of gingivitis. In gingivitis ,  gums may be swollen, tender and sometimes bleed during brushing. This early stage of the disease responds well to good brushing and flossing habits and regular dental checkups.
Medications change this completely
The American Dental Association lists blood thinning medications as one of the possible causes of bleeding gums. These medications  the blood's ability to clot, which can lead to easier bleeding. Let your dentist and doctor know about your experience and any medications you may be on.
New Flossing Routine
Changing your flossing routine can also lead to bleeding gums. For example, if you haven't remembered to floss in a few days or if you have begun to floss more frequently to help remove food and plaque from between your teeth, then you may notice some bleeding. This should clear up within a week.
New Toothbrush
Switching from a soft-bristled toothbrush to a firm brush may also result in gums that bleed. Try returning to a soft or medium-bristled brush and talk to your dentist about what toothbrush is right for you at your next appointment.
Pregnancy Gingivitis
Some pregnant women experience swollen gums and bleeding during brushing. This is known as pregnancy gingivitis. Hormonal changes during pregnancy alter the body's response to the bacteria that causes gum disease. Generally symptoms should clear up after pregnancy. A dental checkup and regular brushing and flossing can help to prevent gum problems from becoming worse.
Bleeding gums can be a sign of gingivitis, which can develop into the more serious stages of gum disease. The best way to find out what is causing your gums to bleed is to see your dentist and dental hygienist.

 

What is Fluoride? How is it important for kid.   
 

Doctor: Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in all water sources, including oceans, rivers and lakes. Fluoride is also added to some community tap water, toothpastes and mouth rinses. Infants and toddlers who do not receive an adequate amount of fluoride may be at an increased risk for tooth decay since fluoride helps make tooth enamel more resistant to decay. It also helps repair weakened enamel. Bottled water may not contain fluoride; therefore, children who regularly drink bottled water or unfluoridated tap water may be missing the benefits of fluoride. If you are not sure if your tap water has fluoride, contact your local or state health department or water supplier.

Discuss your child’s fluoride needs with your dentist or pediatrician. They may recommend a fluoride supplement if you live in an area where the community water is not fluoridated.

Patient:

When should I plan to go for the first visit to the dentist for my kid. Everything seems to be normal. Should I go to crosscheck if the growth is good or should I only visit when there are any problems.

Doctor:

As soon as your child’s first tooth appears, it’s time to schedule a dental visit. The ADA recommends that the first dental visit take place within six months after the first tooth appears, but no later than a child’s first birthday. Don’t wait for them to start school or until there's an emergency. Get your child comfortable today with good mouth healthy habits.
Although the first visit is mainly for the dentist to examine your child’s 0ral hygiene   & to check growth and development, it’s also about your child being comfortable. To make the visit positive:

  • Consider making a morning appointment when children tend to be rested and cooperative.
  • Keep any anxiety or concerns you have to yourself. Children can pick up on your emotions, so emphasize the positive.
  • Never use a dental visit as a punishment or threat.
  • Never bribe your child.
  • Talk with your child about visiting the dentist.
Patient: During this visit, what can I expect the dentist to:

Doctor:
  • Inspect for oral hygiene , cavities or other problems.
  • Let you know if your child is at a risk  for developing the tooth decay.
  • Clean your child’s teeth and provide tips for daily care.
  • Discuss teething, pacifier use, or finger/thumbsucking habits.
  • Discuss treatment, if needed, and schedule the next check-up.

At what age should my kid start getting teeth : 

Teething is one of the first rituals of life. Although newborns usually have no visible teeth, most baby teeth begin to appear generally about six months after birth. During the first few years of your child’s life, all 20 baby teeth will push through the gums and most children will have their full set of these teeth in place by age 3. A baby’s front four teeth usually erupt or push through the gums at about six months of age, although some children don’t have their first tooth until 12 or 14 months. As their teeth erupt, some babies may become fussy, sleepless and irritable, lose their appetite or drool more than usual. Diarrhea, rashes and a fever are not normal symptoms for a teething baby. If your infant has a fever or diarrhea while teething or continues to be cranky and uncomfortable, call your physician.

  • Begin cleaning your baby’s mouth during the first few days after birth by wiping the gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth. As soon as teeth appear, decay can occur. A baby’s front four teeth usually push through the gums at about 6 months of age, although some children don’t have their first tooth until 12 or 14 months. 
  • Until you’re comfortable that your child can brush on his or her own, continue to brush your child's teeth twice a day with a  infant  toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. When your child has two teeth that touch, you should begin cleaning between their teeth daily.
  • For children younger than 3 years, caregivers should begin brushing children’s teeth as soon as they begin to come into the mouth by using fluoride toothpaste in an amount no more than a smear or the size of a grain of rice. Brush teeth thoroughly twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or physician. Supervise children’s brushing to ensure that they use the appropriate amount of toothpaste.
  • For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Brush teeth thoroughly twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or physician. Supervise children’s brushing and remind them not to swallow the toothpaste.

Why Did My Teeth Change Colour?

Food and Drink
Coffee, tea and red wine  can stain your teeth. What do they have in common? Intense colour pigments called chromogens that attach to the white, outer part of your tooth enamel.

Age
Over time, the outer enamel layer gets thinner with  age, which allows more of the yellowish dentin to shows through.

Tobacco Use
Two chemicals found in tobacco create stubborn stains: Tar and nicotine. Tar is naturally dark. Nicotine is colourless until it’s mixed with oxygen. Then, it turns into a yellowish, surface-staining substance. 

Trauma

If you’ve been hit in the mouth, your tooth may change colour because it reacts to an injury by laying down more dentin, which is a darker layer under the enamel.

Medications

Tooth darkening can be a side effect of certain antihistamines, antipsychotics and high blood pressure medications. Young children who are exposed to antibiotics like tetracycline and doxycycline when their teeth are forming either in the womb or as a baby may have discoloration of their adult teeth later in life. Chemotherapy and head and neck radiation can also darken teeth.